guide to buffalo bayou
  parks
  canoe and kayak trails
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history
     
   

Memorial Park

6501 Memorial Drive
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Dept.: 1925
Size: 1,431.35 acres

 

Memorial Park

Buffalo Bayou Park

Spotts Park

Sabine-to-Bagby Park

Sam Houston Park

Sesquicentennial Park

Allen’s Landing


James Bute Park

Guadalupe Plaza Park

Tony Marron Park

Hidalgo Park

Terry Hershey Park

     

Buffalo Bayou Park

18-3600 Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive
Size: 124.05 acres

With downtown’s skyline as its back drop, Houston’s premier greenbelt winds from Shepherd Drive on the west to Bagby Street on the East End. Eleanor Tinsley Park, located within this greenway (Taft-Sabine), is the site of major Houston festivals and events, including the city’s Fourth of July Fireworks.

Special Features:

  • Hike and bike trails
  • Exercise stations
  • Jim Mozola Memorial Disc Golf Course (north bank immediately west of Sabine Street)
  • “Dog Park” (site where dog lovers informally meet ) (2700 block of Allen Parkway at Studewood)
  • Boat Launch (Eleanor Tinsley Park)
  • Children’s Playground (Eleanor Tinsley Park)
  • Buffalo Bayou Artpark (temporary public art work is displayed) (north bank immediately west and east of Sabine Street)
  • Henry Moore Sculpture (south bank east of Taft Street)
  • Police Memorial (north bank off Memorial Drive between
  • Fonde Recreation Center (110 Sabine Street)
  • Cemeteries: Beth Yeshurun (3600 Allen Parkway) and Glenwood Cemetery (2525 Washington Avenue)
  • Amenities: Benches, Trash Receptacles and Drinking Fountains

 

 
 

Sabine-to-Bagby Promenade

150 Sabine Street

Opened: 2006

Size: 23 acres

The new $15 million Sabine to Bagby Waterfront Park includes hike and bike trails on both sides of the bayou linking the Allen Parkway/Memorial Drive trails in the west with Sesquicentennial Park in downtown. The new 23-acre park's features include 12 new street-to-bayou access points, dramatic lighting, native landscaping, canoe launches, civic artwork and picnic lawns.

read more here.


   

Spotts Park

401 South Heights Boulevard
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Dept.: 1980
Size: 16.24

Special Features

  • Trail/Walkway
  • Basketball Court
  • Volleyball Court
  • Children’s Playground
  • Picnic Area
  • Amenities: Benches, Trash Receptacles, Drinking Fountains

 

   

Sam Houston Park

1000 Bagby
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Dept.: 1899
Size: 19.70 acres

In 1899, Sam Houston Park became Houston’s first public park. Historic postcards reveal “City Park” as it was then known, as having a children’s zoo, wading pool and picturesque wooden bridges. Today, as home to the Houston Heritage Society, the park is devoted to preserving Houston’s history by restoring and interpreting early historic structures.

Special Features:

  • Small Pond with Fountain
  • Wetland Garden
  • Gazebo
  • Trail/Walkways
  • Neuhaus Garden
  • Heritage Society Homes: The Old Place (1823), Pilot House (1868), San Felipe Cottage (1868), Staiti House (1905), Yates House (1870), Kellum Noble House (1847), St. John Church (1891), Nichols-Rice-Cherry House (1850)
  • Heritage Society Museum, Gift Shop and Offices
  • Houston Armillary Sphere Sculpture
  • USS Houston Memorial Sculpture
  • Amenities: Benches, Trash Receptacles and Drinking Fountains

 

   

Sesquicentennial Park

Bagby
Acquired by City of Houston Convention & Entertainment Facilities Dept.: 1986
Size: 22.5 acres

The result of a nationwide design competition, Buffalo Bayou Sesquicentennial Park has become an urban oasis in the heart of Houston’s downtown Theater District. Serving as the park’s gateway, the two-acre Phase I site, completed in 1989, includes a cascading fountain, gatehouse, and octagonal pavilion adjacent to the Wortham Theater. The 8.2-acre Phase II section of the park, which opened in the 1998, features the following elements:

  • The Common
    A gently sloping 1.25-acre lawn flanked by a walkway and stately trees. Be sure to check out artist Dean Ruck’s historic photographic display, located in the balustrade railings overlooking Buffalo Bayou.
  • Allen H. Carruth Promenade
    Shaded by large cypress trees and enclosed by an historic balustrade overlook wall, the 24-foot walkway features five of the massive park pillars, created by architects TeamHou and artist Mel Chin.
  • Preston Avenue Bridge
    Designed as a pedestrian link to the bayou’s east and west banks, the Preston Avenue Bridge is lined with wide sidewalks, and replicas of the historic lighting that once adorned this early bayou crossing. Two park pillars can be found on each side of the bridge.
  • The Garden Club of Houston Garden
    Located on the western bank of Sesquicentennial Park, you will find this natural sweeping grassy slope the perfect spot for an afternoon picnic. The site, which has been designated a Texas Wildscape by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department, contains extensive native plantings, unique stonework, and natural water pools.
  • George Bush Monument
    The George Bush Monument, a tribute to the 41st American president, was unveiled to the public in December of 2004.The exhibit features an eight-foot, 650-pound bronze sculpture of the former president and a semicircular wall consisting of four bas-reliefs that depict President Bush in various stages of his life. The statue is well-lighted and includes benches and paved footpaths. Visitors approaching on foot will find the stately green space in Sesquicentennial Park, on the west bank of Buffalo Bayou across from Wortham Center. Motorists can park at metered spaces near the park entry at Bagby and Franklin streets.
  • Few Houstonians have played as critical a role in national and international matters as James A. Baker, III, our nation's 61st Secretary of State. Secretary Baker led the U.S. in foreign affairs at a pivotal moment in history-the peaceful end of the Cold War. His service is unique, having held senior positions for three U.S. presidents: Secretary of State under George H.W. Bush, Secretary of the Treasury under President Ronald Reagan and Undersecretary of Commerce under President Gerald Ford. To commemorate his place on the world stage and his relationship with his home city, his statue sits in downtown Houston across Buffalo Bayou from Bush Monument. Artist Chas Fagan sculpted the statue for Baker Common, which recognizes Secretary Baker and his distinguished forebears: Judge James A. Baker, Captain James A. Baker and his father, James A. Baker Jr. The monument was dedicated in October 2010.
  • The Josephine B. and Anthony Charles Muller Overlook
    Park your bike at this overlook site, situated on a bayou curve near the Prairie and Bagby Street Bridge. It is the perfect spot to take in the spectacular view of Houston’s downtown buildings.
  • Seven Wonders
    Rising dramatically above Buffalo Bayou’s Sesquicentennial Park are the seven 70-ft-tall pillars “Seven Wonders.”. Flanking the park’s Promenade and Preston Avenue Bridge, the columns highlight Houston’s history through the themes of agriculture, energy, manufacturing, medicine, philanthropy, technology and transportation. Each column is constructed of 150 individual children’s drawings, etched in stainless steel plate.

 

   

Allen’s Landing

1001 Commerce Street
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Department: 1966
Size: 1.76 acres

Often described as “Houston’s heart” and our “Plymouth Rock,” Allen’s Landing is an area that truly defines our city. It was here in 1836 that August C. and John K. Allen stepped ashore and claimed Houston as their own. The confluence of Buffalo and White Oak bayous also became Houston’s first port and a thriving commercial hub.

After years of deterioration and numerous planning efforts, Allen’s Landing is undergoing major revitalization and rejuvenation.

Phase I Redevelopment (Completed 2001)

Cost: $2.8 million
Funders: City of Houston Parks & Recreation Department, Harris County Flood Control District and Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Special Features:

  • Concrete paved wharf designed to replicate the original Port
  • Promenade
  • Terrace Overlooking Bayou
  • Trail/Walkway
  • Entry plaza at Intersection of Commerce and Main
  • Terraced Grass Lawn
  • Text-based Public Artwork
  • Amenities: Benches, Trash Receptacles, Drinking Fountain, Bike Rack, Decorative Lighting

Phase II

Cost: $1.8 million
Funders: Texas Department of Transportation and Buffalo Bayou Partnership
Improvements will be made west and east of the existing park.

In addition to the Allen’s Landing Phase I and II initiatives, the Cotswold Project, a $ million downtown streetscape enhancement project, will be constructing pedestrian connections from Commerce Street to the bayou. Four major entryways will include: stairs, ramps, landscaping, signage and public art.

Allen’s Landing Master Plan
To coordinate more than $25 million of existing and $6 million of proposed projects along Buffalo Bayou in north downtown, the Buffalo Bayou Partnership created the Greater Allen’s Landing Master Plan, in cooperation with major governmental and community stakeholders. (SEE ALLEN’S LANDING PLAN ON WEBSITE).

 

   

James Bute Park

McKee Street
Acquired by Harris County Precinct Two:
Size:

   

Guadalupe Plaza Park

2311 Runnels
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Dept.: 1986
Size: 6.46 acres

Mariachi and salsa music, ballet folklorico, and seasonal festival are among the sites and sounds that fill Hispanic-styled Guadalupe Plaza Park in the East End’s Second Ward neighborhood.

Special Features:

  • Performing Arts Area Centered Around a Colonial Zocalo
  • Trail/Walkway
  • Fountain
  • Boat Landing

 

 

Tony Marron Park

808 North York
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Department: 1987
Size: 19.07 acres

The Park People, a non-profit citizen’s organization that promotes parks and open space, has successfully completed development of this underutilized green space in Houston’s East End Second Ward neighborhood.

Special Features of the Park:

  • Trail/Walkway
  • Playing Fields for Soccer and Baseball
  • Children’s Playground
  • Landscaping
  • Amenities: Benches, Picnic Tables, Trash Receptacles, Drinking Fountains

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hidalgo Park

7000 Avenue Q
Acquired by City of Houston Parks & Recreation Department: 1927
Size: 11.60 acres

Since its founding in 1927 at the Turning Basin, Hidalgo Park has been at the center of the East End’s cultural and civic life. Neighborhood residents raised money to purchase the park’s orginal land and sponsored the creation of its unqiure quiosco (gazebo).

Special Features:

  • Quiosco (Gazebo with concrete columns and railings to look like tree trunks)
  • Creative wooden playground designed and partially funded by neighborhood children
  • Baseball Field
  • Amenities: Benches, Trash Receptacles, Decorative Lighting

  

     Terry Hershey Park

15200 Memorial Drive @ Memorial Mews
Houston, Texas 77079

Hours: 7:00 am until 10:00 pm

Parks Reservations Office: (281) 496-2177
No alcoholic beverages allowed.
Pets are allowed (on leash).

Directions to Terry Hershey Park (Using Live.com Maps)

Facilities Photo Gallery
Terry Hershey Park History 
Layout of Terry Hershey Park (Adobe Acrobat PDF Icon below.)

Patrolled by Harris County Constable Pct 5
E-mail Park Admin Office

General Park Rules